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Posts Tagged ‘Books’

Mar
7
2011

If you’re committed to teaching your kids your native language, reading to them in that language is oh-so-important.  Too bad that the number of engaging Telugu picture books for kids is so limited.  It seems that for every good Telugu book out there, there are 200 English ones ready to lure the kids away.

I really do lament the lack of resources.  Yes, there are some quality publishers out there, but not enough if you have voracious readers like I do.  So I do whatever bilingual parent eventually resorts to – reading English books in Telugu by substituting the words (although, as my son is now learning to read, I may have to start taping Telugu text over the English counterparts).  Not all English books are suitable for switching – especially those that rely on rhymes or have a decidedly Western theme and vocabulary (e.g. Halloween or Valentines books).

Here are 5 of my kids’ favourite books they love to hear in Telugu (and amenable to substitutions in other languages I’m sure):

1.  Listen, Listen!:  Simple nouns and verbs, mixed in with fun sounds.  A great vocabulary builder.

2.  The Little Engine That Could:  The repetition in the scenes makes for easy substitution – and the story line keeps the reading interesting.  Kids learn about feelings and emotions.

3.  God, Dog. Go!:  Perhaps our all-time favourite – terrific for learning opposites and colours.

4.  Clip-Clop:  A fun romp about a horse who gives rides to farm animals.  Good for learning about questions and commands.

5.  Harold and the Purple Crayon:  A creative masterpiece in any lanugage.

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Aug
11
2010

Want a glimpse of our new products?  Take a look at our Coming Soon page for a peek!  We’ll be formally introducing the new line up during our New Products Week in September, where you’ll be taken behind the scenes to meet the artists and the history behind each project.

Our new line up includes 18 books (3 books offered in Gujarati, Hindi, Tamil, Telugu (and 2 in Kannada), as well 4 precious handmade memory/keepsake books), a fabulous high-style Alphabet Poster, new apron designs and adult-sized aprons, as well as a collection of eco-friendly personalized stationery and prints featuring bold, colourful and (of course) South-Asian-inspired graphics.

So you see, we’ve been quite busy this summer!  Gnaana is growing…thanks to you, our readers and customers…so keep the fire going by spreading the word!

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Jun
3
2010

We actually don’t have any coffee tables in our house (it’s a vaastu thing), so we’d call these “end table books.”  I like to display books around the house – so the kids can browse through them when they want.  I rotate the books (like I do with our toys) every now and then to keep things fresh – but these 3 are my absolute favourites – and are always story-starters for the kids:

Light of India: A Conflagration of Indian Matchbox Art by Warren Dotz :  This is much more than a book of pretty matchbox visuals – think of it as a concise distillation of Indian history, culture and iconography.  From images of India’s historical heroes, architecture, religious and political symbols – it’s great learning for the kids.  It really is “India in a matchbox.”

Around the Word in 80 Plates by Rashmi Uday Singh:  From Asia to Europe and Africa and Australia, this book is a collection of recipes from 80 celebrated chefs around the world.  AND all the dishes are vegetarian!  I fail to understand why this book hasn’t received more press – it’s a must-have in any gastronome’s library.

Beasts of India by Gita Wolf and Kanchana Arni:  This is an amazing compilation of Indian folk and tribal art that kids can really relate to.  There are pictures of lions, tigers and other “beasts” in various regional art – even my 4-year-old can distinguish between Madhubani and Gond styles.  And the book is actually “handmade” – it’s screenprinted on handmade paper.  Talk about art!

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