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Posts Tagged ‘jewelry’

Jan
7
2010

Organize Jewelry Jewelry Tin Box Custom Creative

I envy those moms who manage to be perfectly accessorized – a fab necklace and earrings and all – while being out and about with their kids.  For me, it’s a struggle to find a matching top and bottom in time before the kids throw my toothbrush in the toilet, so digging through my mess of a jewelry drawer to find a pair of earrings is not an option.

But I resolve that this year will be different.  And first things first – I need to be able to find my jewelry if I’m every going to be able to wear any of it.  So I dreamed-up these clever jewelry tins to organize my coordinating sets.  I ordered several dozen of these 2.8 inch round tins with clear lids and glued some pretty ribbon around them.  I lined the tins with coordinating tissue paper, and now my jewerly rests in their beautiful beds – neatly stacked and visible.

And when I travel, I can just pop the relevant tins into my suitcase and be on my way!

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Dec
15
2009
A Tale of Two Colors
Author: Gnaana

Red and green.  They’re the infamous colours of Christmas, of course.  But this colour combination is also widely used in traditional Indian jewelry.  I remember many jewelry-shopping trips in India when I rejected necklaces or bangle sets because they were “too Christmasy” – leaving my relatives perplexed and shopkeepers muttering under their breath.

So all the red and green these days leaves me wondering: why are these colours so celebrated in India?  The answer takes us back to Mughal times and the tradition of Meenakari jewelry-making.

The art of decorating metal with enamel is known as Meenakari (or “Meena work”)  – a craft which originated in Persia and was first introduced to India by the Mughals in the city of Jaipur, Rajasthan.  It is used in jewelry-making, as well as crafting gift boxes and other metal furnishings.  The technique requires highly-skilled artisan to engrave intricate designs on metal and then hand-paint liquid enamel within the designs, which then harden when heated.  Talk about attention to detail!

And where did the red and the green come in?  Well, along with white, they’re described as “traditional Mughal colours” – colors that integrated the rubies, emeralds diamonds and pearls found in India.  Also, South Indian temple jewelry that was offered to the Gods was made with red and green semi-precious stones – thereby elevating them to the status of auspicious colors.

So this Christmas, as you speed past shimmering hues of red and green, you’ll know that even in ancient India these colours were celebrated as being festive, divine and just darn beautiful!

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Oct
7
2009
Baby bangles
Author: Gnaana

Baby Bangles

I finally got around to buying my little girl some playful baby bangles (the plastic/resin type – not the you-can-never-wear-these-because-you-will-lose-them-22k gold bangles).  She loves them!  They jingle oh-so-cutely when she shakes her arm.  I have no idea whether they are compliant with the new US safety regulations for childrens’ products, (the CPSIA of 2008), but, hey, I’m pretty sure I wore these when I was a baby in India – and I turned out fine.  Makes me think:  the original baby wrist rattle toy!

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